Sunday, April 18, 2010

The Edwardian Boudoir Revisited

Dressing our Grandmothers and Great Grandmothers was not a simple task. First came the Chemise, worn next to the skin to protect both the skin and the expensive boned corset. Made from light weight cotton batiste it was washable and a lady would have several. Drawstring neckline and armholes with hook and eye closures in back. The ruffled neckline was meant to adorn a low bodice or to provide extra bulk for that Pouter Pigeon Look.

Then came the corset. The excruciating S Curve which was not only uncomfortable, but I'm sure was unhealthy.


And over the corset went the Corset Cover. More bulk, more weight but oh so beautiful. Also made of light weight cotton batiste with loads of lace and drawstring closures.



And here's the final result..........that perfect 1910 Pouter Pigeon look in all white. She looks so pristine but she must be dying from the weight of all that fabric.

2 comments:

Rosanna said...

contrary to popular belief, the S curve was NOT unhealthy. Victorian corsets were way worse.
The S curve corset prevented the lumbar spine from becoming too straight, an issue many curvy ladies had (and have!!!), because it would support the lumbar spine, keeping it arched, at the same time supporting the breasts.

CEMETARIAN We Dig Memories said...

Great information to have. Thank you.